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  • AUCTION TO RAISE FUNDS FOR EARTHQUAKE AFFECTED FRIENDS.

    Published March 15th by Giselle Stafford
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    • CALLING ALL FOLK NEAR AND FAR! WE HAVE STUNNING DONATIONS READY FOR YOU TO VIEW AND BID ON! *

    This upcoming Auction is to raise enough money to pay for a temporary home for our friends Mark and Sarah.

    Save the Date! Sunday 19th March at 9 am Italy time! Running for one full week and ending on Sunday 26th March at 11.30 pm Italy time.

    Sarah and Mark work tirelessly to help the affected pets and farm animals from the devastating earthquakes around Amatrice, Italy last year. Tragically, their home was also very badly damaged in the second wave of earthquakes in late October and has been declared uninhabitable. We desperately want to help them to raise the money to have temporary accommodation near their home. Having a base will enable them to continue to help the animals more easily.

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  • Photographing An American-Italian Wedding Abroad

    Published February 8th by ErinAbroad
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    In September, I went to the wedding of a childhood friend in Italy. Never would I have thought that my friend Maria, from rural California where we played in creeks and rode horses, would be marrying an Italian man in the high fashion streets of Milan.

    A day before the wedding, I learned I would be one of the wedding photographers since there would not be an official photographer. It’s a good thing I enjoy photography and have a good camera!

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  • Why Choose an International School?

    Published January 19th by PSS International Removals
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    When you move your family to a new country, choosing the right schools for your children can be one of the most difficult tasks. Learning about an unfamiliar education system and finding answers to your questions can be tricky, especially if there’s a language barrier.

    Many countries allow expats access to school places within their own state system, but another option to consider is sending your child to an International School.

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  • Learning the Local Language

    Published January 10th by ErinAbroad
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    When you become an expat, you have a lot to learn. Not only are you confronted with an unfamiliar location with its own environment, climate, culture, and people, but most likely a different language, too. If you are not fluent in the local language, you might end up feeling like an outsider. Listening to a conversation, you feel like you’re watching a movie without any sound: you might get the gist of what is going on around you, but you don’t understand everything.

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  • Non ci sono problemi! - No problem!

    Published December 24th, 2016 by Stef Smulders
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    In 2008 we moved to Italy and bought a house to start our B&B Villa I Due Padroni. This post tells how we found the house, an adventure on its own …

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  • Dating in Rome

    Published December 12th, 2016 by John Henderson
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    If “Roman Holiday” dealt with true romance in Rome, the scene would have Peck ogling another woman on the sidewalk, Hepburn performing a fair imitation of the Heimlich maneuver and Peck careening his scooter right into the Trevi Fountain. They’d surface scratching and screaming, two soaked, soon-to-be ex-lovers wondering why they keep putting up with each other.

    John Henderson shares what he has learned about dating in Rome.

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  • Thanksgiving in the Etruscan Countryside

    Published November 30th, 2016 by Susie White
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    Americans living in Italy, no matter our differences, seem to have one thing in common: we all miss Thanksgiving. Our Italian friends are also quite fascinated by our holiday and all of the incredible (and unusual to them) foods and recipes we prepare. Since the fourth Thursday of November (for some very odd reason, wink wink) isn’t a holiday in Italy, I’d say most of us who actually do celebrate Thanksgiving, do so on the weekend.

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  • A Californian Native Experiences an Earthquake in Italy

    Published November 15th, 2016 by Evelin Gutierrez
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    I didn’t know what it meant to feel an earthquake on foreign soil. As a Californian, earthquakes happen regularly. You can say I am used to seismic activity but in Italy I have come to understand there is a massive difference and risk.

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  • Should you ship your car abroad?

    Published November 9th, 2016 by PSS International Removals
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    The decision to move abroad sets in motion a period of months of organisation and decision making. Many questions will be raised about how to orchestrate your move and what to take.

    Your car presents one of the thorniest questions – is it better to take your car with you, or sell it and buy another set of wheels when you arrive in your chosen country?

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  • What happens when wild animals need help?

    Published August 25th, 2016 by Aina
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    Hello, I am Aina. My husband and I arrived from Norway together with 3 cats almost 10 years ago, just to discover that the house was all ready inhabited by 2 feral dogs. That was the start. Many animals in need has become Citizens after that. Today we have cats, dogs, rabbits, minipigs, parrots, budgies, ducks, hens, geese, goats and sheep. We try to do our bit to help animals in need. Luckily we have a big house and 4 hectares of land.

    CRAS – Centro Recupero Animali Selvatici
    What happens when wild animals need help?

    One of Italia’s Wildlife Rescue centres is situated in Bernezzo (Piedmont). What used to be a small zoo has today been transformed into a wildlife hospital and rehabilitation centre. The centre has 1.5 employees (one full-time and one part-time; the rest is done by volunteers, including two veterinarians. The centre is not open to the public, but you can call them 24/7 if you find an injured or ill wild animal.

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